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Diamond Quartz Specimen 8

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Original price $150
Current price $120

Extremely rare specimen of Diamond Quartz. Indefinite number of small Diamond Quartz are aggregated making it a very nice and rare specimen .

Dimensions (length, width, height): 5.1cm x 2.7cm x 4.9cm

Weight: 60 grams

Origin: Wud Mine, Balochistan, Pakistan.

 

It looks like a Tortoise.


 

QUARTZ:

Quartz is a hard, crystalline mineral composed of silicon and oxygen atoms. The atoms are linked in a continuous framework of SiO4 silicon–oxygen tetrahedra, with each oxygen being shared between two tetrahedra, giving an overall chemical formula of SiO2. Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in Earth's continental crust, behind feldspar.

 

Varieties (according to color)

Pure quartz, traditionally called rock crystal or clear quartz, is colorless and transparent or translucent, and has often been used for hardstone carvings, such as the Lothair Crystal. Common colored varieties include citrine, rose quartz, amethyst, smoky quartz, milky quartz, and others. These color differentiations arise from the presence of impurities which change the molecular orbitals, causing some electronic transitions to take place in the visible spectrum causing colors. Other opaque gemstone varieties of quartz, or mixed rocks including quartz, often including contrasting bands or patterns of color, are agate, carnelian or sard, onyx, heliotrope, and jasper.

 

Amethyst

Amethyst is a form of quartz that ranges from a bright vivid violet to dark or dull lavender shade. The world's largest deposits of amethysts can be found in Brazil, Mexico, Uruguay, Russia, France, Namibia and Morocco. Sometimes amethyst and citrine are found growing in the same crystal. It is then referred to as ametrine. An amethyst is formed when there is iron in the area where it was formed.

 

Blue quartz

Blue quartz contains inclusions of fibrous magnesio-riebeckite or crocidolite.

 

Dumortierite quartz

Inclusions of the mineral dumortierite within quartz pieces often result in silky-appearing splotches with a blue hue, shades giving off purple and/or grey colors additionally being found. "Dumortierite quartz" (sometimes called "blue quartz") will sometimes feature contrasting light and dark color zones across the material. Interest in the certain quality forms of blue quartz as a collectible gemstone particularly arises in India and in the United States.

 

Citrine

Citrine is a variety of quartz whose color ranges from a pale yellow to brown due to ferric impurities. Natural citrines are rare; most commercial citrines are heat-treated amethysts or smoky quartzes. However, a heat-treated amethyst will have small lines in the crystal, as opposed to a natural citrine's cloudy or smokey appearance. It is nearly impossible to differentiate between cut citrine and yellow topaz visually, but they differ in hardness. Brazil is the leading producer of citrine.

 

Milky quartz

Milk quartz or milky quartz is the most common variety of crystalline quartz. The white color is caused by minute fluid inclusions of gas, liquid, or both, trapped during crystal formation, making it of little value for optical and quality gemstone applications.

 

Rose quartz

Rose quartz is a type of quartz which exhibits a pale pink to rose red hue. The color is usually considered as due to trace amounts of titanium, iron, or manganese, in the material. Some rose quartz contains microscopic rutile needles which produces an asterism in transmitted light. Additionally, there is a rare type of pink quartz (also frequently called crystalline rose quartz) with color that is thought to be caused by trace amounts of phosphate or aluminum. The color in crystals is apparently photosensitive and subject to fading.

 

Smoky quartz

Smoky quartz is a gray, translucent version of quartz. It ranges in clarity from almost complete transparency to a brownish-gray crystal that is almost opaque. Some can also be black. The translucency results from natural irradiation creating free silicon within the crystal.

 

Prasiolite

Prasiolite, also known as vermarine, is a variety of quartz that is green in color. It is a rare mineral in nature; most green quartz is heat-treated amethyst.

 

GENERAL

Category

oxide mineral

Formula

SiO2

Strunz classification

4.DA.05 (Oxides)

Dana classification

75.01.03.01 (tectosilicates)

Crystal system

α-quartz: trigonal
β-quartz: hexagonal

Crystal class

α-quartz: trapezohedral (class 3 2); β-quartz: trapezohedral (class 6 2 2)

Unit cell

a = 4.9133 Å, c = 5.4053 Å; Z=3

Identification

Formula mass

60.083 g·mol−1

Color

Colorless through various colors to black

Crystal habit

6-sided prism ending in 6-sided pyramid (typical), drusy, fine-grained to microcrystalline, massive

Twinning

Common Dauphine law, Brazil law and Japan law

Cleavage

{0110} Indistinct

Fracture

Conchoidal

Tenacity

Brittle

Mohs scale hardness

7 – lower in impure varieties (defining mineral)

Luster

Vitreous – waxy to dull when massive

Streak

White

Diaphaneity

Transparent to nearly opaque

Specific gravity

2.65; variable 2.59–2.63 in impure varieties

Optical properties

Uniaxial (+)

Refractive index

nω = 1.543–1.545
nε = 1.552–1.554

Birefringence

+0.009 (B-G interval)

Pleochroism

None

Melting point

1670 °C (β tridymite) 1713 °C (β cristobalite)

Solubility

Insoluble at STP; 1 ppmmass at 400 °C and 500 lb/in2 to 2600 ppmmass at 500 °C and 1500 lb/in2

Other characteristics

lattice: hexagonal, Piezoelectric, may be triboluminescent, chiral (hence optically active if not racemic)